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Cooking with stew meat?

Texas K-Girl

Senior Member
I’ve seen several recipe recently that call for stew meat. Soups usually. Not sure what I’m doing wrong, but every time I’ve tried cooking stew meat it turns out tough and dry. I buy the package that specifically says stew meat. Is there an alternative? Any tips or hints appreciated.
 
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hand

Senior Member
When I make beef barley soup or a beef stew I usually buy a chuck roast and cut it into pieces. Not sure if that would work for you.
 

anna

Senior Member
Low and slow is best. I sear mine in a skillet before putting it in the stew to slowly simmer. I also look for some marbling on the meat when choosing it. Lean cuts of stew meat will not be as flavorful when cooked.
 

Ima Teacher

Senior Member
I will cook stew meat in the crock pot on low all day, like 12 hours or longer. I have a friend who uses her instant pot and gets good results, but I haven’t tried it.
 

linda2671

Senior Member
I love to use stew meat in the instant pot or in the crock pot. I sear the meat in olive oil until it’s brown. Then add all the other ingredients for your soup or stew. When I use the instant pot, I cook the soup for about 45 minutes, and then let it do a natural release for about 15 minutes. The meat will be so tender you can shred it by pressing it agains the side of the pot. In the crock pot, it doesn’t get tender enough to shred like that, but it will get very tender by cooking all day.
 
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cabernet

Senior Member
As others have stated stew meat is tough and needs to cook a long time, eight hours on low in a crockpot or three hours on low on the stove. We have found that a nicely marbled Chuck roast cut into chunks works the best. DH browns it for beef stew. When the stew is ready, DH cuts the chunks into smaller pieces. You could do that before cooking, but DH thinks it dries out the meat.
 

MathWA

Senior Member
Stew meat is usually cut up chuck meat or round. I prefer the convenience of buying it already cut up or you can do it yourself, but there is no difference in the end result. Sometimes I cut the big chunks into smaller ones for easier eating, etc.

This type of meat is tough and must be simmered in some form of liquid for a very long time to break down the connective tissue that holds it together. This makes the meat tender but your stew meat will not dry out if its cooked in liquid. Great winter weather for stew!
 
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