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Guided reading for advanced readers

Reading | Literature 

MSMITH

Junior Member
HELP!!!! I would love any ideas on what books or things you all use in your highest level guided reading group. I discovered this week that several of my students are already reading chapter books.
Thanks for all your wonderful ideas!!
 
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linda2671

Senior Member
It depends on their level.

Some easy chapter books are Mrs. Piggle Wiggle, Mr Popper's Penguins, Magic Tree House, Junie B Jones, Henry and Mudge, and Amelia Bedelia. You could also check Scholastic's Book Wizard for specific levels.
 

ginadoo

Full Member
They may be reading chapter books already but what do you know about their comprehension skills? I think we first grade teachers get very excited with those kids who decode well and get them to magic treehouse just a bit prematurely. I've been thinking about having those high readers start with some higher level thinking picture books so we can really work on what it means to comprehend, to ask questions as you read and make inferences. To react and have deep thoughts and talk to others about what they thought about the same text. Some books I've used are Jamaica's find, the Leaving Morning, Carrot top (I think that's the name...) once I'm satisfied that they can think beyond the surface level then they can try longer texts. Just my thoughts...
 

Marcigran

Full Member
Chapter books

I like to assess their reading first, to make sure they are decoding correctly and really understand what was read. Fountas & Pinnell has running record and comprehension questions for their benchmark books. So does A to Z reading.

I have had kids decode 100% accurately but not pass comp? questions.

Assuming they really are super readers, try nonfiction selections and teach how to answer questions using text evidence. Have them write responses to a book or selected chapters in a notebook.

Use picture books at levels above M. They should have some good vocabulary words.
Get the app called level it. You can scan bar code or type in title of favorite read aloud books. There rare good alternatives to chapter books!

If they really are advanced, let them bring in book from home to keep in their desk so they always have something good to read.

Lit circles are great if kids can work together.
 

linda2671

Senior Member
First graders who read well are not always ready to work independently. It's really hard to know what to do with those kids who can read the words in anything they pick up, because they can't always comprehend what they're reading, and they rarely are able to work on book projects without an adult present. There are some who are able to comprehend higher levels, but most of them should work on comprehension skills with lower level books.
 
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rachelmpd

Senior Member
Modified

What I did with my low 2nd graders was modified literature circles. They loved it. I used book packets-Jennifer Bates has several good ones on TpT. If they aren't independent (which with 1st graders will be iffy), you can read, discuss, and answer the questions with them. This will help you gauge their comprehension also. If they are independent they can do it on their own and you can just check in with them/correct their packets.
 

MSMITH

Junior Member
Thank you all!

Thanks so much! I totally agree about being readers but NOT comprehending! I've seen that many times. I love the literacy circle idea and I think I can make it first grade friendly! I will also look at Jennifer Bates things. I appreciate your ideas! Can't wait to use them!
 

beachbumteach

Senior Member
high first graders

Last year, I had only two students who were considered to be 'high' readers. Once we got through all of the first grade levels, I tried a Cam jenson chapter book with them during guided groups. It was too hard for them --- my mistake! <!--misspeak-->They lost interest and weren't comprehending it. I immediately started them on the second grade level picture books and they enjoyed this much more. With those higher readers who have NO trouble decoding, I would work on higher order comprehension skills for sure...I use the beanie baby reading strategies like questioning owl, connecting spider (making connections), visualizing, inferring iguana (making inferences), etc.
 

Out2Recess

Full Member
high level pic books

Beachbumteach: Can you give some examples of the higher level picture books you used with your students. Mine could use a challenge as well.
 

pinkday

Junior Member
With my high readers, I'll start out with close reading passages, showing them how to look really closely at what they're reading--find the main idea and locate information to prove answers to comprehension questions. When they're able to do that, then they can work a little more independently on picture books or chapter books.
 
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