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Just a question....

kittenicole

New Member
I was just wondering can a person major in something else like nursing or business and still do teaching? Like the post that someone put up that they majored in one thing for their bachelors and then did something with their masters so that they can teach. What is that all about; I am very interested!!
 
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F

Florida

Guest
Teacher prep programs for non-education major

I found this post on another bulletin board. There seem to be a lot of programs out there for non-education majors to become teachers. Do a search for "alternative teaching programs" or something along those lines. Good luck!


Teaching credential prep program designed for working adults:


http://mcc1.mccfl.edu/teach/Programs/Programs.html

Classes meet during the evening twice per week and one Saturday a month. Train for a new career while continuing to work full-time. This program is designed specifically for post-baccalaureate non-education majors. Please email or call for more information. Next program will start January 10th.

www.mccfl.edu
email: sheffis@mccfl.edu
(941)-752-5264

*You do not have to be a Manatee County resident to take the program*
 

LauraTeach

New Member
Hello!

Lots of people do this and I've read that it's a good idea - if you ever decide to leave teaching you'll have something else to fall back on.

You may be talking about me re: the masters degree. I got my bachelors in something besides teaching (human services). My masters degree is a "Master of Arts in Teaching" (MAT) and is designed specifically for people who have undergrad degrees in something besides education, as opposed to a Master of Education which I believe requires you to have a bachelors in education. A lot of schools have the MAT program. At my college it is a 14 month program so it doesn't take very long.

Like the other poster said, a lot of schools also offer Alternative Certification Programs. My college offers this as well, however I chose to go for my master's because the requirements were not very different and the master's would only take a few months longer. At my college this is called the ACT program and the main difference is there are fewer required credit hours and the internship is half as long. You don't get a degree with this type of program but you do get your teacher certification.

Let me know if you have any other questions! :)
 

Chicago Teacher

Full Member
Undergrad in something else

I got my undergrad degree in Sociology and planned to become a school social worker before I decided to become a teacher instead.

I found a graduate program for people with degrees in areas other than Ed. It's a 2 year program where you take classes full time in the summer (8am-10pm M-F) and then teach in your own classroom during the year and take 1 night class at the same time. It was extremely difficult (placements were at low income schools), but the 11 of us who started together all lived together in a house rented by the school so we were able to get together at night and share war stories and get advice from each other. Also, in addition to living "for free" we were given a stipend for teaching ($12K/yr) that covered expenses like food, car insurance, etc. And, the program was connected with AmeriCorps so after the 2 years we received $$$ to pay off student loans (I can't remember the amount, around $6000). It was also an M.Ed. program, instead of an MAT program.

There are lots of different kinds of programs, so I would suggest looking in to schools in your area if you are interested.
 

Hifiman

Senior Member
been there, done that

By the time I decided I really wanted to try teaching I had already earned my bachelors in information systems. There was no way I was going back to take more classes just so I could enter a credential program. Then by accident I found out it doesn't matter what you get your degree in just that you have one.
 
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