• Are you a teacher? Join us! Register Now for a free ProTeacher account!

Rhyming Words

Advertisement

Sbkangas5

Senior Member
Songs, poems, rhyming books, matching games, and lots and lots and lots of repetition. I find that many of my language learners have a very hard time with rhyming words, even when they are solid readers.
 

NoMorePencils

Senior Member
The only way to teach rhyming is to model it all the time!! When reading a rhyming story, totally emphasize the rhyming words. Once they get that.. leave off the rhyming word to see if they can guess it. Another great strategy is a game called Oops! Wrong Rhyme. You tell a child to "Please sit in your bear! Oops... I meant please sit in your...."(chair). The kids LOVE this game!

A fabulous resource for all phonemic awareness things is:
Marilyn Yager Adams book-
https://www.amazon.com/Phonemic-Awareness-Young-Children-Curriculum/dp/1557663211
 
Last edited:

anna

Senior Member
We have a daily little language opening where the kids learn why words rhyme (same middle and ending sound) and we practice the concept. We stretch the words on our arm and the rhyming parts are on the inside of our elbow and on the palm of our hand.This is addition to hearing read alouds with rhyming language.
 

AddieJ

Senior Member
Down by the Bay is one of our all time favorites too! So is A-Huntin' We Will Go. Willoughby Wallaby Woo (or however you say it - there are many variations) from Raffi is great for rhyming with a student's name. Willoughby Wallaby Woo, An elephant sat on You; Willoughby Wallaby Wee, An elephant sat on me. Willoughby Wallaby Wason, An elephant sat on Jason, etc....
Nursery rhymes are a great way to teach rhyming words because most are silly and the kids enjoy them: Hey Diddle Diddle, Humpty Dumpty, Itsy Bitsy Spider, etc. Many kids are familiar with nursery rhymes - although this is slowly changing :( I've noticed that many of my students do not know the ones I would have learned growing up. Insert the students' names into the nursery rhymes - they LOVE that!
Teaching word families - like the -at family - helps students practice the idea that it's the ending chunk that is the same in each word, therefore they rhyme (we can just change the first letter and get a brand new rhyming word.)
 

Lexis

Full Member
Thanks so much for all the suggestions! They are all great ideas. I can't wait to use some of them when we get back to school. I am in NC and we are having floods from Hurricane Matthew and will probably be out of school for two weeks.
 
Advertisement

 

Top