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What is the difference between balanced literacy and literacy collaborative?

Reading | Literature 

PindleLou888

Full Member
Going to be starting literacy collaborative and I need to learn more specific things about it. The framework looks like the balanced literacy framework I think.
 
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sevenplus

Senior Member
Literacy Collaborative is the same as balanced literacy in that you do the same components (interactive read aloud, shared reading, guided reading, community writing, writing workshop, and word work).

How LC varies is it uses a specific coaching approach and all teachers must receive a minimum number of professional development hours. It is trademarked so only schools that meet specific LC criteria can use the LC name.

I am a trained primary LC coach.
 

PindleLou888

Full Member
Thanks Sevenplus, that helps a lot! I don't think that the school I'm going to has the coaching and classes. Is there a point when the school no longer has that? What happens when new people come to the school?
 
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Linda/OH

Senior Member
Balanced literacy

Our school uses the philosophy of balanced literacy with all of the components. So your school may be the same.
My understanding is The Literacy Collaborative is Fountas and Pinnells business and marketing name. Since they are the "gurus" of balanced lit.
 

PindleLou888

Full Member
Is a spelling list or word families used? Is there a teacher's guide? I have been using empowering writers for writing. Would I still be able to use that? F & P have so many books. Which ones should I buy? ,Sorry about all the questions
 

sevenplus

Senior Member
Some of your questions will need to be answered at your school. LC is not a curriculum. It's just the framework.

Traditional spelling tests will not be done, but word study will sometimes involve word families. What grade will you be teaching? We use Kathy Ganske's Word Journeys. It's about learning spelling patterns.

The newest version of Fountas and Pinnell's Guided Reading is an excellent resource. If you teach an intermediate grade you'll want Guuding Readers and Writers.

Responsive Literacy: A Comprehensive Framework is another excellent resource.

I'm not familiar with the writing resource you mentioned. LC is about authentic reading and writing. During a writing lesson you'd do a minilesson, probably model, give lots of time for independent writing, do conferences or meet with a small group, and have students share.
 

PindleLou888

Full Member
Yes that writing programs sounds just like that. I will be teaching 4th grade. Thank you for the book suggestions. I really need something concrete that I can refer to. And someone told me that there is no literacy coach there. That's why I'm asking all these questions LOL it's been my experience in our district that they pretty much throw you into the room and expect you to just do it. So maybe it's not technically a literacy collaborative school anymore. Maybe they just used what they learned and then the district stopped paying for the coaching services or something. I really want to hit the ground running with this.
 

sevenplus

Senior Member
Good luck!

I was trained as a primary coach but have worked a bit with teachers using the intermediate framework. I'm always happy to answer questions.
 

PindleLou888

Full Member
Thanks so much! I'm glad you guys told me how balanced literacy is very similar to literacy collaborative, that makes it easier for me to digest and imagine.
 
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sevenplus

Senior Member
r9miles, LC is about responsive teaching and authentic reading and writing. Therefore you won't find a scope and sequence for a specific order to teach letters, nor will you find decodable readers such as "The fat cat sat on the mat."

We usually begin teaching letters and sounds using the children's names.

Phonics instruction is typically differentiated. There is a brief word work segment of each guided reading lesson.

Word study groups frequently do sorts based on sounds, rhyme, spelling patterns, etc.

I believe Fountas and Pinnell do refer to their phonics and word study programs as systematic, but use of their program is not a required component of LC.
 

r9miles

Senior Member
Follow up questions

So students learn to read by listening to reading, analyzing sets of words, and looking at books?
 

sevenplus

Senior Member
r9miles, I can't tell if you're looking for a debate or honestly trying to understand. I'm not sure where you got that all students do in a balanced literacy classroom is listen to reading, analyze sets of words, and look at books.

There is very explicit instruction that takes place.

Guided reading is the heart of LC, in my opinion. Children are taught to read by having them read carefully selected texts and closely monitoring their problem-solving. Learning to decode words is certainly an important piece, but students don't need to know all of the phonemes in a word to be able to read it in context.

Throughout the day, massive amounts of reading and writing take place - modeled, with support, and independently.
 
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